November 23, 2011

AMD C-60 APU

The AMD C-60 (codename Ontario) is a 9W APU which replaces the AMD C-50 APU. It features relatively powerful integrated graphics card and a single channel DDR3-1066 memory controller. Both C-60 and C-50 feature two Bobcat cores that can access 512KB level 2 cache per core, but the C-60 adds additional features which is called AMD Turbo Core support both on the CPU and GPU. Compared to the Intel Atom processors, the Bobcat architecture utilizes an out-of-order execution and for that reason this is faster at the same clock speed, but it is underpowered it terms of its performance to similar clocked Penryn (Celeron) or Danube (Athlon II) cores.

The C-60 runs at the same clock speed which is 1GHz like the C-50, but the C-60 can increase its clock speed up to 1.33GHz. The GPU of the C-60, on the other hand, can increase it performance to up to 400MHz from its 276MHz default speed. This seems to be just a slight change to the chip and associated BIOS. The new AMD C-60 is still made using the same TSMC 40nm process and retain the same 9W TDP. The new C-60 gains multimode DisplayPort support (DP++). The symbol, ++, means that it is possible to carry HDMI and DVI signals over the DisplayPort connector, which permits OEMs (Original equipment manufacturer) to construct systems with a single DisplayPort output and deliver passive dongles for single-link DVI and HDMI out.
In comparison to the Atom processors, the Bobcat architecture uses an "out-of-order" execution and is therefore faster at the same clock speed. However, the performance is far worse than similar clocked Penryn (Celeron) or Danube (Athlon II) cores.
The higher the PASSMARK rating the better the performance.

The PassMark PerformanceTest permits you to quantitatively benchmark a PC using a variety of different speed tests and compare the results to other computers.

1 comments:

Allan said...

Thanks for the information. I am not a techie person but with your inputs on the AMD Dual Core C60 which I used on my netbook, made me some understanding about it.
Thanks.